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Showing category "Noise" (Show all posts)

What Is the Most Annoying Sound in the World?

Posted by Admin on Saturday, November 3, 2012, In : Noise 

It’s so universal that it’s become a cliché: nails on a chalkboard. When it comes to noises that bother everyone’s ears, it’s seemingly a given that scraping fingernails across a slate board is the one that everyone hates most.


But when a group of neuroscientists decided to test which sounds most upset the human brain, they discovered that fingernails on a chalkboard isn’t number one. It’s not even number two. As part of their research, published last week in the Journal of Neur...


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Dissonant music brings out the animal in listeners, say UCLA researchers

Posted by Admin on Wednesday, June 13, 2012, In : Noise 

Ever wonder why Jimi Hendrix's rendition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" moved so many people in 1969 or why the music in the shower scene of "Psycho" still sends chills down your spine?



A UCLA-based team of researchers has isolated some of the ways in which distorted and jarring music is so evocative, and they believe that the mechanisms are closely related to distress calls in animals.


They report their findings in the latest issue of the peer-reviewed scientific journal Biology Letters, ...


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How selective hearing works in the brain

Posted by Admin on Wednesday, April 18, 2012, In : Noise 

The longstanding mystery of how selective hearing works – how people can tune in to a single speaker while tuning out their crowded, noisy environs – is solved this week in the journal Nature by two scientists from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).


Psychologists have known for decades about the so-called "cocktail party effect," a name that evokes the Mad Men era in which it was coined. It is the remarkable human ability to focus on a single speaker in virtually any env...


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Man-made noise 'harms plant growth'

Posted by Admin on Friday, April 13, 2012, In : Noise 

A growing body of research shows that birds and other animals change their behavior in response to human-made noise, such as the din of traffic or the hum of machinery. But human clamor doesn't just affect animals. Because many animals also pollinate plants or eat or disperse their seeds, human noise can have ripple effects on plants too, finds a new study.


In cases where noise has ripple effects on long-lived plants like trees, the consequences could last for decades, even after the source ...


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